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University of Alberta

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This set of 4 rasters shows precipitation as snow (mm) for Western North America under the B1 Emissions Scenario from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). One layer shows the historic period (1961 to 1990), and there are three layers of future climate projections representing the 2020s, the 2050s, and the 2080s. These future layers are ensemble averages across all 23 CMIP3 AOGCMs (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models). All layers have a resolution of 1 km, and are designed to capture climate gradients, temperature inversions, and rain shadows in the mountainous landscape of western North America. These data, originally published here, were converted...
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This set of 4 rasters shows winter (Dec to Feb) mean temperature (deg C * 10) for Western North America under the A1B Emissions Scenario from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). One layer shows the historic period (1961 to 1990), and there are three layers of future climate projections representing the 2020s, the 2050s, and the 2080s. These future layers are ensemble averages across all 23 CMIP3 AOGCMs (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models). All layers have a resolution of 1 km, and are designed to capture climate gradients, temperature inversions, and rain shadows in the mountainous landscape of western North America. These data, originally published...
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This set of 4 rasters shows mean temperature of the coldest month (deg C * 10) for Western North America under the B1 Emissions Scenario from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). One layer shows the historic period (1961 to 1990), and there are three layers of future climate projections representing the 2020s, the 2050s, and the 2080s. These future layers are ensemble averages across all 23 CMIP3 AOGCMs (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models). All layers have a resolution of 1 km, and are designed to capture climate gradients, temperature inversions, and rain shadows in the mountainous landscape of western North America. These data, originally published...
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