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This dataset contains two feature classes - contacts and map units - digitized from the Atlas of Mars 1:5,000,000 Geologic Series Map Amenthes Area (1979). Geologic structures have been omitted.
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Point file of planetary nomenclature features and attributes
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Almost all the pictures acquired by Mariner 10 that were used for mapping were obtained during the first encounter: those covering the southeast half of the quadrangle are incoming close-encounter images, and those covering the north-west corner are outoing close-encounter images. At the time the pictures were obtained, the terminator was at about long 7° to 8°, within the eastern part of the quadrangle. A large gap in coverage between in the incoming and outgoing images appears as a northeast-trending diagonal blank strip on the base map. A small part of this gap was filled in the southwestern part of the quadrangle by very poor second-encounter images.
The Coprates quadrangle lies to the east of the Tharsis volcanic complex and the Noctis Labyrinthus tectonic complex. To the north are the plains of Lunae Planum, to the east the vast patches of chaotic terrain and the large sinuous channels that trend northward into Chryse Planitia. On the southwest is the Thaumasia Fossae region of tectonically deformed cratered terrain, to the southeast, the Argyre Basin, the best preserved of the ancient martian impact basins. The geology of the Corpates quadrangle is dominated by the Valles Marineris chasma system, which stretches in an east-southeast direction for about 2,500 km across the quadrangle. Its maximum width is about 600 km from the north rim of Ophir Chasma to...
The Noachis quadrangle is in the ancient cratered highlands of Mars. Craters dominate the surface of the planet in this area; most are of impact origin, some are of volcanic origin, and some are of undetermined origin. Impact craters in the Noachis quadrangle are classified into four groups based on their morphologic characteristics, each group representing a relative age range. Where applicable, superposition relations support relative age determinations based on crater morphology.
Tags: Geology, Mars, Noachis
The Systematic mapping of lava flow units in the Tharsis region has been compiled into a series of 16 maps at 1:2,000,000 scale. This work provides information on the sources and areal extent of the lava flows, on their eruptive sequences and relative ages, and on relations between the flows and geologic structure in the largest, most active tectonic and volcanic province on Mars. Some of the maps were made from controlled Viking photomosaics published as quarter quadrangles in the Atlas of Mars Topographic Series (U.S. Geological Survey, 1979) and tied to the Viking control net. Where these photomosaics were not available, larger scale catalog photomosaics tied to the Mariner 9 control net were used. These maps...
The geology of the Argyre quadrangle of Mars is dominated by the conspicuous Argyre basin, defined by a rim of rugged mountain blocks that surrounds a nearly circular expanse of plains 800 km across. Of the large (greater than 500 km in diameter) basins identified on Mars, Argyre is the best preserved and probably the youngest. Basins appear to be traps for eolian debris and evidently are source areas for some of the dust storms that periodically envelop the planet. The quadrangle lies within the densely cratered province that characterizes the southern hemisphere, contrasting with the sparsely cratered plains generally confined to the northern hemisphere. Northwest of Argyre an outlier of sparsely cratered, ridged...
Tags: Argyre, Geology, Mars
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, working with members of the scientific community, has determined that early manned lunar exploration will be oriented primarily to investigations in the geosciences. Exploration by man on the lunar surface will, therefore be geological, geophysical, geochemical, geochemical, and surveying in nature, and will be directed to the physical and chemical characteristics of the lunar crust, and to measurements that will furnish data pertinent to understanding the physics of the Moon. Scientific exploration of the Moon will provide information fundamental to understanding the origin and composition of the Solar System, and engineering data important to the design of specific...
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The surface of the Moon is heterogenous. Local surfaces can be classed on the basis of telescopic observations into units, each having a limited range of physical properties such as topograhpy, visible under low illumination. The properties of such surface units are considered to represent properties of under lying materials, so that the surface units corespond to underlying rock units which are analogous to the rock-stratigraphic formations of terrestrial geology. These rock units are arranged in order of relative age and grouped into time stratigraphic units by application of the concepts of superpositon and intersection, and by their apparent modification of properties with time. Following terrestrial convection,...
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Volcanoes are among the most imposing and geologically interesting features on Mars. Nearly 60 percent of the planet’s surface is covered by volcanic rocks dating from the Early Noachian to Late Amazonian Epochs (Tanaka and others, 1988). This map of the volcano Apollinaris Patera and surrounding area is one of a series of large-scale (1:500,000) geologic maps initiated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to investigate areas of particular scientific interest. The areas selected for mapping contain candidate landing sites for future sample-return missions to Mars (fig. 1).
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These geologic and topographic maps show a basin in the Elysium region of Mars that is thought to have been the site of a large paleolake during the most recent period (Amazonian) in Mars' history (Scott and Chapman, 1991b). The basin, referred to as the Elysium basin, extends for more than 2,000 km across the lowland plains. It is important, not only geologically, but because the amount, location, and duration of liquid water that it may have contained would have been critical factors governing the possible origin and survival of life on Mars.
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The geology for this map was compiled using Viking Orbiter images on 1:500,000- scale photomosaics of the Mars Transverse Mercator quadrangles -40262, -40267, and -40272. This map represents a detailed extension of regional geologic mapping of the east Hellas rim (Crown and others 1990, 1992) and is published at 1:1,000,000 scale. The map area is on the east rim of one of the largest impact structures in the Solar System, the ~2,000-km-diameter Hellas basin (fig. 1). Channeled plains, with Dao, Harmakhis, and Reull Valles as the primary drainage features, dominate much of the surface within the map area. Dao Vallis is the downstream extension of Niger Vallis, which originates on the south flank of Hadriaca Patera,...
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Most images used in mapping the geology of the Shakespeare quadrangle were taken during the near-equatorial first pass, with close encounter on the dark side of the planet. The second, south-polar pass did not image the Shakespeare quadrangle at high resolution. High-resolution images of small areas within the quadrangle were also obtained during the third pass, when the spacecraft was on the near-encounter north-polar trajectory. Because the spacecraft viewed the same areas from different positions during the first and second passes, stereoscopic pictures are available for certain areas of the southern hemisphere; however, such pictures are not available for the Shakespeare quadrangle. This map includes a strip...
The Lavinia Planitia quadrangle (V–55) is in the southern hemisphere of Venus and extends from 25° to 50° south latitude and from 330° to 360° longitude. It covers the central and northern part of Lavinia Planitia and parts of its margins. Lavinia Planitia consists of a centralized, deformed lowland flooded by volcanic deposits and surrounded by Dione Regio to the west (Keddie and Head, 1995), Alpha Regio tessera (Bindschadler and others, 1992a) and Eve Corona (Stofan and others, 1992) to the northeast, itself an extensive rift zone and coronae belt to the east and south (Baer and others, 1994; Magee and Head, 1995), Mylitta Fluctus to the south (Magee Roberts and others, 1992), and Helen Planitia to the southwest...
Material exposed on the surface of the moon is heterogeneous. The albedo and other physical characteristics that have been determined with the use of optical and radio telescopes vary from one part of the moon to another, and the variations are partially correlated with differences in topography . Discontinuities in the areal variation permit the surfaces material to be divided into map units, each exhibiting a limited range of topographic characteristics. Each map unit is further characterized by a distinctive pattern of distribution, and the patterns of certain units are in places superimposed on the patterns of other units. From the relations of superposition it is possible to determine the sequence in which...
Material exposed on the surface of the moon is heterogeneous. The albedo and other physical characteristics that have been determined with the use of optical and radio telescopes vary from one part of the moon to another, and the variations are partially correlated with differences in topography . Discontinuities in the areal variation permit the surfaces material to be divided into map units, each exhibiting a limited range of topographic characteristics. Each map unit is further characterized by a distinctive pattern of distribution, and the patterns of certain units are in places superimposed on the patterns of other units. From the relations of superposition it is possible to determine the sequence in which...
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This map shows the geology in and around two potential early Apollo landing sites in the lunar equatorial belt. The Wichmann CA region is in Oceanus Procellarum, south of the equator, approximmately 320 km south of the crater Kepler. It is covered by mare material with numerous ridges, low domes, craters, and crater clusters. Relatively few of the craters are larger than 200 m across. Terra material is absent.
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Material exposed on the surface of the Moon is heterogeneous. The albedo and other physical characteristics that have been determined with the use of optical and radio telescopes vary from one part of the Moon to another, and the variations are particular correlated with differences in topography. Discontinuities in the areal variation permit the surface material to be divided into map units, each exhibiting a limited range of photometric properties associated with a limited range of topographic characteristics. Each map unit is further characterized by a distinctive pattern of distribution, and the patterns of other units. From the relations of superposition it is possible to determine the sequence in which the...
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This geologic map of Mars was compiled largely from Mariner-9-based 1:5,000,000-scale geologic maps prepared by several authors. However, many of the geologic units of the larger scale maps have been combined and revised to provide continuity of portrayal so that this map expresses our own concepts as well as those of the mappers at the larger scale.


map background search result map search result map Geologic Map of the Victoria Quadrangle of Mercury Geologic Map of the Amenthes Quadrangle of Mars Recommendations of Subgroup on Surface Physics: Agenda for Adhoc Apollo Group Meeting - 19 May 1962 Manned Lunar Exploration Investigations Plan Of Research, And Work Plan And Operating Budget. Fiscal Years 1965-1966 Geologic map of the Wichmann CA region of the Moon, Lunar Orbiter Site III P-11, Oceanus Procellarum including Apollo landing sites 4 and 4R (LAC-40) Geologic map and section of the Timocharis region of the Moon (LAC-38) Geologic map of the Seleucus quadrangle of the moon Geologic map of the Shakespeare Quadrangle of Mercury Geologic map of science study area 8, Apollinaris Patera region of Mars Geologic and topographic maps of the Elysium Paleolake basin, Mars Geologic map of the Dao, Harmakhis, and Reull Valles region of Mars Recommendations of Subgroup on Surface Physics: Agenda for Adhoc Apollo Group Meeting - 19 May 1962 Manned Lunar Exploration Investigations Plan Of Research, And Work Plan And Operating Budget. Fiscal Years 1965-1966 Geologic map of the Wichmann CA region of the Moon, Lunar Orbiter Site III P-11, Oceanus Procellarum including Apollo landing sites 4 and 4R Geologic map of science study area 8, Apollinaris Patera region of Mars Geologic map of the Dao, Harmakhis, and Reull Valles region of Mars (LAC-40) Geologic map and section of the Timocharis region of the Moon (LAC-38) Geologic map of the Seleucus quadrangle of the moon Geologic Map of the Amenthes Quadrangle of Mars Geologic map of the Shakespeare Quadrangle of Mercury Geologic Map of the Victoria Quadrangle of Mercury Geologic and topographic maps of the Elysium Paleolake basin, Mars