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Gower Gulch at the north end of the Black Mountains. Borate-bearing fanglomerate partly sheared across steeply tilted borate beds. Basalt flow in playa clays in the distance. Mine portal at left of center. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Panorama in two parts. Photo 48 and 49. (see ttp00049)
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Brecciated Ordovician (?) quartzite in basaltic fanglomerate at the north end of Artist Drive Hills near Mushroom Rock. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938.
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Death Valley National Park, California. Typical stand of burroweed near the road along Furnace Creek Wash, above Corkscrew Canyon. This shrub grows on the high parts of the gravel fans above the main stands of creosote bush. Burroweed grows in washes between bare surfaces on the fans with desert pavement. Commonly, desert holly grows along the sides of the washes, and burroweed on the bottom. Photo by J.R. Stacy, circa 1960. Figure 18, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 509. Sketch of photo.
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Death Valley National Park, California, circular pattern due to collapse of salty mud into a pool of salty water. These structures are common to the flood plain in the vicinity of the salt pools. Photo by J.R. Stacy, circa 1960. Figure 37, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 494-B. Drawing of photo.
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Desert holly (Atriplex hymenelytra),the most drought resistant shrub in Death Valley. The ash of the leaves contains 30 to 35 percent of sodium chloride. Death Valley National Park. Inyo County, California. ca. 1960. (Photo by J. R. Stacy)
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Death Valley National Park, California. Ten miles south of Furnace Creek on the east slope of the Panamint Range. Road crossing Death Valley in the right foreground. October 11, 1900.
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Death Valley National Park, California. Sand Springs at the north end of Death Valley. View is to the south. September 11, 1900.
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Olivine gabbro boulders weathered from fanglomerate in the Salt Creek Hills to the east of the Panamint Mountains. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938.
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Death Valley National Park, California. Tubular orifices in the fine sediments at Salt Springs near the north side of Borax Camp allow discharge of water to the valley floor. Light areas are accumulations of salts from previous discharges. Circa 1960. Figure 10, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 494-B.
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This point shapefile represents 38 terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) survey scan locations collected by single-base real-time kinematic (RTK) global navigation satellite system (GNSS) surveys in Grapevine Canyon near Scotty's Castle, Death Valley National Park, from July 12-14, 2016. Data were collected by two Topcon GR-3 GNSS receivers at one-second intervals for three minutes for each location.
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This polygon shapefile represents estimated flood-inundation areas in Grapevine Canyon near Scotty's Castle, Death Valley National Park. Estimates of the 4, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.2 percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flood streamflows (previously known as the 25, 50, 100, 250, and 500-year floods) were computed from regional flood regression equations. The estimated flood streamflows were used with one-dimensional hydraulic models to compute water surface elevations that were mapped on a digital terrain model of the study area. Those locations where the water surface was higher than the land surface were defined as inundated. The inundation polygons are named by AEP flow (4, 2, 1, 0.5, 0.2-percent) and geometry...
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In support of paleoclimatology investigations, samples of mammillary calcite, calcitic folia, and flowstone were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in Devils Hole and Devils Hole Cave 2, Nevada, between 1983 and 1996. These samples came from about 60 m below to 9 m above the modern water table in these caverns. To determine δ18O and δ13C time series spanning the interval 567.7–4.5 ka, more than a thousand samples were milled and analyzed for their δ18O and δ13C values. To determine time-series ages, more than a hundred samples were analyzed using uranium-series dating. Many of these measurement results have not been published. Herein, we provide previously unpublished δ13C and δ18O values, and we provide unpublished...
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Death Valley National Park, California. Travertine deposits at dry springs along the Furnace Creek fault zone. Two levels of the travertine can be seen. The lower one (tl) drapes over the side of Furnace Creek Wash (foreground) and reaches the floor of the valley. The upper travertine (tu) forms the bench at the skyline in the center. Pre-pottery type projectile points were found on the travertine. Circa 1960. Figure 56, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 494-A. Sketch of portion of photo.
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Death Valley National Park, California. West distributary of Salt Creek where it crosses the smooth silty rock to the flood plain in Cottonball Basin. This channel is 32 feet wide and 1 foot deep. Much of the efflorescence on the channel upstream from the pool is mirabilite, the hydrous sodium sulfate. Circa 1960.
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Album caption: U.S. Geological Survey party determining the elevation of the lowest point in the United States, Death Valley, California, 276 feet below sea level, by a spirit level line. L.F. Biggs and party. January 1907. (Lantern slide March 1, 1913). Handwritten notes on album caption: Also San Francisco Exposition no. 56; Death Valley National Monument, Inyo County. Index card: Geological Survey party determining altitude of Death Valley. Inyo County, California. 1907. Plate 7-T, U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 817.
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Death Valley National Park, California. Desert pavement in the foreground. View is west from the Park Village fault block. Weathering of boulders and cobbles at the surface has produced a new mantle of blocks, slabs, and flakes, forming a smooth desert pavement in which the stones are closely spaced but barely or not at all shingled. Circa 1964. Figure 50, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 494-A.
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Fig. 20. Dive light [(about 8-in (15-cm) long] is resting vertically on accumulation of sunken calcite rafts about 4 ft (1.2 m) below water surface, west wall of Browns Room. The accumulation resembles a miniature talus. Water surface and folia are visible near the top and right corner of photo, respectively. 1986. Additional information: Devils Hole Picture Story Principal investigator: Isaac J. Winograd, U.S. Geological Survey (retired). Principal research dive team: Alan C. Riggs, U.S. Geological Survey (retired); Peter T. Kolesar, Professor Emeritus, Utah State University, Logan, Utah; and Ray J. Hoffman, U.S. Geological Survey (retired). Description of Figures All of the above-water and underwater figures...


map background search result map search result map Death Valley National Park, California. Tubular orifices in the fine sediments at Salt Springs near the north side of Borax Camp allow discharge of water to the valley floor.  Circa 1960. West distributary of Salt Creek. Death Valley National Park, California. 1960. Death Valley National Park, California. Travertine deposits at dry springs along the Furnace Creek fault zone. Circa 1960. Desert holly (Atriplex hymenelytra),the most drought resistant shrub in Death Valley. The ash of the leaves contains 30 to 35 percent of sodium chloride. ca. 1960. Death Valley National Park, California. Desert pavement in the foreground. View is west from the Park Village fault block. Ruins of Harmony Borax Mill. Death Valley National Park, Death Valley, California. 1938. Casts of bird tracks. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Gower Gulch at the north end of the Black Mountains. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Travertine vein in Funeral Fanglomerate. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Olivine gabbro boulders weathered from fanglomerate. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Brecciated Ordovician (?) quartzite in basaltic fanglomerate. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. U.S. Geological Survey party determining the elevation of the lowest point in the United States, Death Valley, Inyo County, California. 1907. Death Valley National Park, California. Sand Springs at the north end of Death Valley. View is to the south. September 11, 1900. Death Valley National Park, California. Ten miles south of Furnace Creek on the east slope of the Panamint Range. Dive light, west wall of Browns Room, Devils Hole, Death Valley National Park, Nevada. 1986. Flood-Inundation Areas in Grapevine Canyon Near Scotty's Castle, Death Valley National Park, California Scan Origins for a Terrestrial Laser Scanner Survey in Grapevine Canyon Near Scotty's Castle, Death Valley National Park, California Stable carbon and oxygen isotope paleoclimate records of U.S. Geological Survey-collected samples from Devils Hole and Devils Hole Cave 2, Nevada Flood-Inundation Areas in Grapevine Canyon Near Scotty's Castle, Death Valley National Park, California Scan Origins for a Terrestrial Laser Scanner Survey in Grapevine Canyon Near Scotty's Castle, Death Valley National Park, California Stable carbon and oxygen isotope paleoclimate records of U.S. Geological Survey-collected samples from Devils Hole and Devils Hole Cave 2, Nevada Dive light, west wall of Browns Room, Devils Hole, Death Valley National Park, Nevada. 1986. Death Valley National Park, California. Tubular orifices in the fine sediments at Salt Springs near the north side of Borax Camp allow discharge of water to the valley floor.  Circa 1960. West distributary of Salt Creek. Death Valley National Park, California. 1960. Death Valley National Park, California. Travertine deposits at dry springs along the Furnace Creek fault zone. Circa 1960. Desert holly (Atriplex hymenelytra),the most drought resistant shrub in Death Valley. The ash of the leaves contains 30 to 35 percent of sodium chloride. ca. 1960. Death Valley National Park, California. Desert pavement in the foreground. View is west from the Park Village fault block. Ruins of Harmony Borax Mill. Death Valley National Park, Death Valley, California. 1938. Casts of bird tracks. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Gower Gulch at the north end of the Black Mountains. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Travertine vein in Funeral Fanglomerate. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Olivine gabbro boulders weathered from fanglomerate. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Brecciated Ordovician (?) quartzite in basaltic fanglomerate. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Death Valley National Park, California. Sand Springs at the north end of Death Valley. View is to the south. September 11, 1900. Death Valley National Park, California. Ten miles south of Furnace Creek on the east slope of the Panamint Range. U.S. Geological Survey party determining the elevation of the lowest point in the United States, Death Valley, Inyo County, California. 1907.