Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: Radar (X)

12 results (27ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
Two identical Radar Stage Sensors from Forest Technology Systems, were evaluated to determine if they are suitable for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrologic data collection. The sensors were evaluated in laboratory conditions to evaluate the distance accuracy of the sensor over the manufacturer’s specified operating temperatures and distance to water ranges. Laboratory results were compared to the manufacturer’s accuracy specification of ±0.007 foot (ft) and the USGS Office of Surface Water (OSW) policy requirement that water level sensors have a measurement uncertainty of no more than 0.01 ft or 0.20 percent of the indicated reading. In the temperature chamber test, both sensors were within the manufacturer’s...
The stable isotope amount effect has often been invoked to explain patterns of isotopic composition of rainfall in the tropics. This paper describes a new approach, correlating the isotopic composition of precipitation with cloud height and atmospheric temperature using NEXRAD radar echo tops, which are a measure of the maximum altitude of rainfall within the clouds. The seasonal differences in echo top altitudes and their corresponding temperatures are correlated with the isotopic composition of rainfall. These results offer another factor to consider in interpretation of the seasonal variation in isotopic composition of tropical rainfall, which has previously been linked to amount or rainout effects and not to...
thumbnail
This dataset offers hourly estimates of radar indicated rain gage corrected precipitation at a roughly 4km spatial resolution. Mosaicked into a national product at NCEP, from the regional hourly multi-sensor (radar+gauges) precipitation analyses produced by the 12 River Forecast Centers over CONUS. Some manual QC done at the RFCs. The Stage II/IV job is run at 33min past the top of each hour. Hourly Stage IV is re-made hourly (if there is new input after valid time for the next 23 hours, then again at 1/3/5/7 days after valid time. These data have been aggregated into this service by the USGS and are downloaded and incorporated into the archive every 30 minutes. The original Hydrologic Rainfall Analysis Projection...
thumbnail
The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), deployed RQ-30 surface velocimetry sensors (hereinafter referred to as “RQ-30 sensors”) made by Sommer Messtechnik to collect radar gage-height data, cross section area, surface velocity, learned surface velocity, discharge, and learned discharge at 80 streamgages located in stream reaches with varying hydrologic and hydraulic characteristics. Land-use types in the contributing drainage basins included agricultural, forest, mixed, and coastal, that are common in central, east, and southeast Texas. Many of the drainage basins and streams have relatively low gradients. To test the efficacy of the remote-sensing methods,...
thumbnail
This dataset offers hourly estimates of radar indicated rain gage corrected precipitation at a roughly 4km spatial resolution. Mosaicked into a national product at NCEP, from the regional hourly multi-sensor (radar+gauges) precipitation analyses produced by the 12 River Forecast Centers over CONUS. Some manual QC done at the RFCs. The Stage II/IV job is run at 33min past the top of each hour. Hourly Stage IV is re-made hourly (if there is new input after valid time for the next 23 hours, then again at 1/3/5/7 days after valid time. These data have been aggregated into this service by the USGS and are downloaded and incorporated into the archive every 30 minutes. The original Hydrologic Rainfall Analysis Projection...
thumbnail
Two identical Radar Stage Sensors from Forest Technology Systems, were evaluated to determine if they are suitable for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrologic data collection. The sensors were evaluated in laboratory conditions to evaluate the distance accuracy of the sensor over the manufacturer’s specified operating temperatures and distance to water ranges. Laboratory results were compared to the manufacturer’s accuracy specification of ±0.007 foot (ft) and the USGS Office of Surface Water (OSW) policy requirement that water level sensors have a measurement uncertainty of no more than 0.01 ft or 0.20 percent of the indicated reading. In the temperature chamber test, both sensors were within the manufacturer’s...
thumbnail
Two identical Radar Stage Sensors from Forest Technology Systems, were evaluated to determine if they are suitable for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrologic data collection. The sensors were evaluated in laboratory conditions to evaluate the distance accuracy of the sensor over the manufacturer’s specified operating temperatures and distance to water ranges. Laboratory results were compared to the manufacturer’s accuracy specification of ±0.007 foot (ft) and the USGS Office of Surface Water (OSW) policy requirement that water level sensors have a measurement uncertainty of no more than 0.01 ft or 0.20 percent of the indicated reading. Both of the sensors tested were within the OSW policy requirement in both laboratory...
thumbnail
Two identical Radar Stage Sensors from Forest Technology Systems, were evaluated to determine if they are suitable for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrologic data collection. The sensors were evaluated in laboratory conditions to evaluate the distance accuracy of the sensor over the manufacturer’s specified operating temperatures and distance to water ranges. Laboratory results were compared to the manufacturer’s accuracy specification of ±0.007 foot (ft) and the USGS Office of Surface Water (OSW) policy requirement that water level sensors have a measurement uncertainty of no more than 0.01 ft or 0.20 percent of the indicated reading. Both of the sensors tested were within the OSW policy requirement in both laboratory...
The stable isotope amount effect has often been invoked to explain patterns of isotopic composition of rainfall in the tropics. This paper describes a new approach, correlating the isotopic composition of precipitation with cloud height and atmospheric temperature using NEXRAD radar echo tops, which are a measure of the maximum altitude of rainfall within the clouds. The seasonal differences in echo top altitudes and their corresponding temperatures are correlated with the isotopic composition of rainfall. These results offer another factor to consider in interpretation of the seasonal variation in isotopic composition of tropical rainfall, which has previously been linked to amount or rainout effects and not to...
thumbnail
The sensor ensemble (DEbris and Floodflow Early warNing System, DEFENS) was deployed in Waldo Canyon, Pike National Forest, Colorado, which was burned during the Waldo Canyon fire in the summer of 2012. The ensemble consists of noncontact, ground-based (near-field), Doppler velocity (velocity) and pulsed (stage or gage height) radars, rain gages, and a redundant radio communication network. This ensemble of instruments was used to calculate stream channel characteristics derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) data. These data were leveraged to predict mean channel velocities based on Manning's equation, which were needed to compute the kinematic celerity and uncertainties and include water level, cross-sectional...
thumbnail
Near-field remote sensing methods were used to collect Doppler velocity and pulsed stage radar data at 10 conventional U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in river reaches with varying hydrologic and hydraulic characteristics. Basin sizes ranged from 381 to 66,200 square kilometers and included agricultural, desert, forest, mixed, and high-gradient mountain environments. During the siting and operational phases, radar-derived mean-channel (mean) velocity and discharge were computed using the Probability Concept (PC) and were compared against conventional instantaneous measurements and stage-discharge time series. During siting phase, radars were located, installed, and PC parameters computed. To test the efficacy...
thumbnail
Two identical Radar Stage Sensors from Forest Technology Systems, were evaluated to determine if they are suitable for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrologic data collection. The sensors were evaluated in laboratory conditions to evaluate the distance accuracy of the sensor over the manufacturer’s specified operating temperatures and distance to water ranges. Laboratory results were compared to the manufacturer’s accuracy specification of ±0.007 foot (ft) and the USGS Office of Surface Water (OSW) policy requirement that water level sensors have a measurement uncertainty of no more than 0.01 ft or 0.20 percent of the indicated reading. Data were obtained as part of a field test where a single RSS was installed...


    map background search result map search result map United States Stage IV Quantitative Precipitation Archive Evaluation of the Radar Stage Sensor Manufactured by Forest Technology Systems, Incorporated—Results of Laboratory and Field Testing FTS RSS Distance Test, John C. Stennis Space Center, Dec 2015 FTS RSS Field Test, Wolf River, 2016 FTS RSS Temperature Test 1, John C. Stennis Space Center, Nov 2015 FTS RSS Temperature Test 2, John C. Stennis Space Center, Jun 2016 Radar-based field measurements of surface velocity and discharge from 10 U.S. Geological Survey streamgages for various locations in the United States, 2002-19 (ver. 2.0, January 2022) United States Stage IV Quantitative Precipitation Archive Near-field Remote Sensing of River Velocity, Stage, and Precipitation during Portions of 2015 in Waldo Canyon, Colorado, USA Radar-based field measurements of gage-height and surface velocity and resulting cross-sectional area and discharge from 80 U.S. Geological Survey streamgages for various locations in Texas, 2021–24 Near-field Remote Sensing of River Velocity, Stage, and Precipitation during Portions of 2015 in Waldo Canyon, Colorado, USA Radar-based field measurements of gage-height and surface velocity and resulting cross-sectional area and discharge from 80 U.S. Geological Survey streamgages for various locations in Texas, 2021–24 United States Stage IV Quantitative Precipitation Archive United States Stage IV Quantitative Precipitation Archive Radar-based field measurements of surface velocity and discharge from 10 U.S. Geological Survey streamgages for various locations in the United States, 2002-19 (ver. 2.0, January 2022)