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A limited amount of valid scientific information about global climate change and its detrimental impacts has reached the public and exerted a positive impact on the public policy process or future planning for adaptation and mitigation. This project was designed to address this limitation by bringing together expertise in the social and communication sciences from targeted academic institutions affiliated with the Department of the Interior’s Climate Science Centers (CSCs) through a workshop. The project team brought together expertise in the social and communication sciences from targeted academic institutions, particularly experts and scholars who are affiliated with the nation’s CSCs, by means of an invited...
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The Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers (CSCs) and their managing organization, the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center at the U.S. Geological Survey, have chosen the emerging climate science field of Ecological Drought as a research focus area. This workshop is part of a series of meetings at each of the nation’s eight CSCs aimed at collating our existing knowledge of the ecological impacts, resistance, and recovery from drought. The eight CSCs provide a fantastic opportunity to compare the ecological effects of drought, related research activities, and management options at different regions, spatial scales, and biomes of drought, related research activities, and management options...
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The State of Alaska has more coastline than the rest of the United Statescombined and extends from the high Arctic to the temperate rainforests and marine waters of Southeast Alaska. Climate change impacts are unique in the Southeast Alaska region and are longer term impacts such as heavy rains causing flooding, ocean acidification, warmer waters, snowfall variations, warm springs followed by frost affecting wild berry production, invasive species, and toxins in the marine environment. These factors impact food security and culturally important resources. This project will provide a summit for Southeast Alaska tribal environmentalcoordinators and other stakeholders tosupport natural and cultural resource conservation...
This project used species distribution modeling, population genetics, and geospatial analysis of historical vs. modern vertebrate populations to identify climate change refugia and population connectivity across the Sierra Nevada. It is hypothesized that climate change refugia will increase persistence and stability of populations and, as a result, maintain higher genetic diversity. This work helps managers assess the need to include connectivity and refugia in climate change adaptation strategies. Results help Sierra Nevada land managers allocate limited resources, aid future scenario assessment at landscape scales, and develop a performance measure for assessing resilience.
Categories: Data, Project; Tags: 2011, 2013, CA, California Landscape Conservation Cooperative, Conservation Design, All tags...
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The goals of this project were to: (1) produce a state-of-the-art assessment and synthesis of climate change projections, impacts, vulnerabilities, adaptive capacity, and prospects for mitigation and adaptation actions in the Southwest in support of the regional contribution to the National Climate Assessment; (2) develop an inventory of federal partners and stakeholders involved with climate adaptation programs, and (3) forge stronger bonds between the DOI-SW CSC, the three NOAA-RISAs in the Southwest, and the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives.
This project uses bottom-up modeling at a parcel scale to measure the effects of sea-level rise (SLR) on coastal ecosystems and tidal salt marshes. At selected tidal marshes, the project team will measure several parameters that will be incorporated into ArcGIS models creating comparable datasets across the Pacific coast tidal gradient with a focus on 2-4 sites in the California LCC (e.g. San Diego, San Francisco Bay Refuges). The ultimate goal is to provide science support tools for local adaptation planning from the bottom-up that may be implemented under a structured decision-making framework.Science Delivery Phase (2013): The objectives are to: (1) Disseminate site-specific baseline data and modeling results,...
Categories: Data, Project; Tags: 2011, 2013, Applications and Tools, CA, CA-Northern, All tags...
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Changes in the Earth’s climate are expected to impact freshwater habitats around the world by altering water temperatures, water levels, and streamflow. These changes will have consequences for inland fish – those found within lakes, rivers, streams, canals, reservoirs, and other landlocked waters – which are important for food, commerce, and recreation around the world. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in 2011, 33.1 million people fished and spent $41.8 billion in the United States alone. Yet to date, little comprehensive research has been conducted to investigate the effects of climate change on inland fisheries at a large scale. The aim of this project was to summarize the current state of...
We brought together expertise in the social and communication sciences from targeted academic institutions, particularly experts and scholars who are affiliated with the nation’s Climate Science Centers, by means of an invited workshop. The purpose of this effort is to bring together such a group but also to focus experts in the nation’s Climate Science Centers on how these Centers’ affiliates can more effectively communicate the science of this important but often misunderstood problem and meaningfully inform effective policy in each region.
Most natural resource managers, planners and policy makers are now dependent upon spatially explicit environmental suitability and spatial allocation analyses to inform policy and management decisions. However, staff across agencies has been unable to stay current on understanding and applying these new data, tools and analyses. Currently, this information may be underutilized or used inappropriately, which could result in poor decisions. Two training curricula were developed – one for managers and one for GIS analysts – on current best practices for developing and using spatial information to support conservation decision making. The training materials are open-source and widely distributed to California LCC stakeholders.
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Tribal communities are especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change because of their reliance on the natural environment to sustain traditional activities and their limited resources to respond to climate change impacts. At the same time, tribes have valuable traditional knowledge that can aid regional efforts to address climate change. There were two overarching goals of this project: The first was to build partnerships between South Central Climate Science Center (SC CSC) researchers and tribal communities, linking tribes with climate change tools and resources and developing a model that could be replicated in other regions. The second goal was to document tribal viewpoints on climate change impacts...
The establishment of the South Central Climate Science Center (SCCSC) heralded new forms of partnership among Tribal nations and members of the climate science and conservation communities. But communicating key concepts such as risk and vulnerability is a culturally specific practice. So these new relationships call for pluricultural conversations about climate change and variability. To contribute to the goal of mutual understanding, this project developed and implemented a series of five workshops -- four in Oklahoma and one in New Mexico -- that introduced Tribal members and employees across the region to the SC CSC as a resource for their climate adaptation practices. Not counting members of the research team,...
The annual Northwest Climate Conference is the region's premier opportunity for a cross-disciplinary exchange of knowledge and ideas relating to climate impacts and adaptation. The conference brings together hundreds of researchers, resource managers and policy makers from academia, public agencies, sovereign tribal nations, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector, to share the latest climate science, challenges to infrastructure, industry, environment and communities, and adaptive solutions. The conference also provides a forum for scientist, manager, and practitioner collaboration and discussion of emerging challenges, policy and management objectives, and information needs related to regional climate...
The California Invasive Plant Council (Cal-IPC) developed a “risk mapping” approach that combines comprehensive distribution maps with maps of current and future suitable range to show where each (invasive) species is likely to spread. The distribution maps are based on a new dataset created through a major campaign to collect expert opinion data from local resource managers across the state. From this dataset, Cal-IPC recently completed risk maps and management recommendations for 43 invasive plant species in the Sierra Nevada. The proposed project will build an online tool for these data. The tool will allow natural resource managers to generate risk maps and summary statistics for areas they select, and to determine...
Categories: Data, Project; Tags: 2010, 2012, 2013, Applications and Tools, CA, All tags...
This project brought together natural resource managers, conservation coordinators and planners, and scientists working at multiple scales within the San Francisco Bay to develop a spatially-explicit decision framework that cuts across jurisdictional boundaries while accounting for uncertainties about climate change. In particular, the SDM framework allows managers within the Bay to identify a recommended strategy among a set of alternative strategies that may vary among its subregions (e.g. North Bay, South Bay, East Bay). Management priorities will be those that yield the greatest expected conservation benefits across the Bay considering multiple objectives including endangered species recovery (e.g. California...
Why Rangelands: The Central Valley of California, the surrounding foothills and the interior Coast Range include over 18 million acres of grassland. Most of this land is privately owned and managed for livestock production. Because grasslands are found in some of California’s fastest-growing counties, they are severely threatened by land conversion and development. In addition climate change stresses grasslands by potentially changing water availability and species distributions.Maintaining a ranching landscape can greatly support biodiversity conservation in the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) region. In addition ranches generate multiple ecosystem services—defined as human benefits provided...
Categories: Data, Project; Tags: 2011, 2012, 2013, Applications and Tools, CA, All tags...
This project supports a collaborative, multi-stakeholder effort led by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) to develop a largescale vulnerability assessment and associated adaptation strategies for focal resources of the Sierra Nevada. The purpose of this effort is to provide information and tools for Forest Planning and management (e.g., NEPA analyses, Forest Plan revisions, Climate Scorecard) and other natural resource management (e.g., SWAP) and conservation efforts to prepare for climate change impacts in the Sierra Nevada. Specifically, our objectives are to: (1) assess the vulnerability of focal resources to climate change, (2) use spatial analysis and expert input to prioritize conservation areas or actions, and...
Categories: Data, Project; Tags: 2012, 2013, Applications and Tools, CA, California Landscape Conservation Cooperative, All tags...


map background search result map search result map Building Capacity within the CSC Network to Effectively Deliver and Communicate Science to Resource Managers and Planners Inter-Tribal Workshops on Climate Change in the Central U.S. Synthesis of Current Science and Assessment of Science Needs for Adaptation in the Southwest State of the Science on the Effects of Climate Change on North American Inland Fishes Alaska EcoDrought Synthesis Workshop Newsletter, September 2015 Southeast Alaska Climate Change Summit Southeast Alaska Climate Change Summit Building Capacity within the CSC Network to Effectively Deliver and Communicate Science to Resource Managers and Planners Inter-Tribal Workshops on Climate Change in the Central U.S. Synthesis of Current Science and Assessment of Science Needs for Adaptation in the Southwest State of the Science on the Effects of Climate Change on North American Inland Fishes Alaska EcoDrought Synthesis Workshop Newsletter, September 2015