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Water surface elevations recorded by submerged water level loggers along the upper Deschutes River, Oregon, between Benham and Dillon Falls, Summer, 2016

Dates

Publication Date
Start Date
2016-03-26
End Date
2016-10-09

Citation

Overstreet, B.T., Kinzel, P.J., Legleiter, C.J., and Wood, T.M., 2017, Water surface elevations recorded by submerged water level loggers along the upper Deschutes River, Oregon, between Benham and Dillon Falls, Summer, 2016: U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/F7DR2SP5.

Summary

Water-surface elevations were recorded by 17 submerged water level loggers between March and October, 2016 along a 3 kilometer reach of the upper Deschutes River, Oregon. 15 water level loggers were installed along the channel margins and 2 loggers were placed in off-channel wetland ponds. Submerged depths recorded at each logger were converted to water surface elevations using real-time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS) measurements of water surface elevation near each water level logger location. Water surface elevation recorded at the loggers captured discharges ranging from approximately 600 to over 2,000 cubic feet/second recorded at the Bureau of Reclamation gage at Benham Falls.

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P7281613.JPG thumbnail 2.83 MB
Deschutes2016_Water_surface_elevation.txt 708.13 KB
DR2016_PT_Metadata_04182017.xml
Original FGDC Metadata

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Purpose

The Upper Deschutes River is regulated to provide irrigation water for downstream agriculture. During the winter months (October – February), streamflow is curtailed at Wickiup Dam and stored in the reservoir resulting in decreased stream flows downstream of Wickiup Dam when compared to historic unregulated flows. Conversely, during summer months (March – September), water is released at Wickiup Dam at a higher than historic rate to meet downstream irrigation demands. During the summer, the Upper Deschutes is flanked by wetlands that support habitat for a number of species including the Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa). Decreased streamflow during the winter dewaters many wetland areas including the wetland ponds in the Benham-Dillon reach monitored here. This dataset provides information on the linkage between streamflow, river stage, and wetland inundation which could provide a mechanism for identifying flow thresholds for wetland inundation and thus inform flow management decisions.

Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
DOI https://www.sciencebase.gov/vocab/category/item/identifier doi:10.5066/F7DR2SP5

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